Author Archives: Bruce Reilly

About Bruce Reilly

Bruce Reilly is the Deputy Director of Voice of the Ex-Offender in New Orleans, LA. He is a graduate of Tulane Law School and author of NewJack's Guide to the Big House. Much of his writing can be found on www.Unprison.org.

Support The Movement: Lower the Damn Rent

The Rent is Too Damn High. You heard Jimmy say it when he ran for Governor of New York (representing “The Rent is Too Damn High” party, no less), and it is increasingly true with every passing day. Want to … Continue reading

Posted in Housing, Movement Building, Reentry

I can relate with Michelle Carter.

I can relate with Michelle Carter. Every so often a criminal case emerges in America that turns into the viral thread and the casual conversation, where everyone seems to have an opinion. O.J., Zimmerman, “The Stanford Swimmer,” Amanda Knox, Casey … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

An overview of Louisiana’s 2017 criminal justice reform bills

It is widely known that Louisiana is the most incarcerated state in the world. This means massive numbers of families and communities have members struggling with a lifetime punishment. Fortunately, we are in an era of reform and the work … Continue reading

Posted in Education, Legislation, Prison Conditions, prison economics, Reentry, VOTE, Voting Rights | Tagged

Trump’s Potential Impact on Criminal Justice Reform

Just like that, America voted for “Change” yet again. Those of us working in the social justice arena, working on our own form of change, are all checking pulses of the people around us, wondering “What does this mean?” The … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

Staying on Point: Can one violent crime derail a Movement?

There can be little doubt that a cultural rise of Punishment-Politicians led America to be the peculiar mass incarcerator of the world. This has not been confined to one geographic area, nor to only locking up people of Color. It … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

1st National Conference of the Formerly Incarcerated, Convicted People and Families Movement: Program and Schedule, Sept. 9th-10th, in Oakland

For those attending the FICPFM conference this coming week, check here for the conference program and schedule. Conference Program Conference Schedule at a glance

Posted in Uncategorized

Registration now open for national movement conference on overturning mass incarceration

At a time when 100 million Americans are trying to move on from their criminal records, hundreds (and possibly thousands) of people will gather in Oakland, California to address their common struggle with an oppressive criminal justice system. The Formerly … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

Louisiana to vote on Voting Rights restoration tomorrow

Today Ban the Box, tomorrow Voting Rights. The Louisiana House of Representatives has heard about prisons and prisoners quite a bit in recent years, and now they are also getting an earful about rehabilitation, reentry, recidivism, probation and parole; about … Continue reading

Posted in VOTE, Voting Rights | Tagged , , ,

What This Election Means for Criminal Justice Reform and America’s Rising Three Party System

There is no need to write an ad hominem synopsis to the unprecedented 2016 Presidential election race, so let’s jump right into it. Those of us who have deep involvement on specific political issues can anticipate what this election means. … Continue reading

Posted in Police, Politics, prison economics, Reentry, Rehabilitation, Voting Rights | Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

2016: The year of voting rights, public defenders, sentencing reform, and Albert Woodfox

 The Epicenter of Race, Voting, and Mass Incarceration New Orleans has always been a national news story. Northern parts of America probably understood the Free People of Color, prior to the Civil War, as much as they could understand contemporary … Continue reading

Posted in Commentary, Innocence, Legislation, Political Prisoners, Politics, Race, Reentry, Uncategorized, VOTE, Voting Rights | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment